Interview With Graphic Designer Erich Brechbhl

“To be honest, just making work is my favourite thing,” says Sydney-based artist and designer, Kris Andrew Small, “I’m not super concerned with how or what I am making.” With a distinctively bold and unencumbered visual language, Kris’ work is also hard to define and often the result of multiple influences and experiences. “I guess a lot of my work comes from my childhood, growing up in the 90s in a tropical part of Australia was pretty colourful and flamboyant, that has always really stuck in my brain.” —. Having been founded in New York, Sharp Type has since been based in Granada, and is now run between Madrid and San Francisco, with employees back in New York, too. Living abroad has given Chantra and Lucas a new perspective on work: “The world is globalising, whether or not people are fighting against it and we found that being in Spain was an amazing opportunity to jump ahead of the curve”, says Chantra. They’ve been working with people in China, Japan, Korea and India, as well as designers across Europe and the US, and finding the balance between working internationally and having a team mentality has been challenging. “We’ve been debating this – how to grow globally, but also be able to get people in the same room, at least occasionally” says Chantra. “When we were in Granada, we’d have lots of people over to our place.

We’d try to have two weeks working, mentoring or just making friends and being in the same space, establishing that rapport”, Lucas continues. “The thing about the industry is, it’s small, and you never know where the next talent is going to pop up.”For its most recent release, Garnett, Sharp Type worked with, who’d originally conceived of it as part of his undergraduate thesis project. “It was nuts”, Lucas says.

  • Alternate Name(s) Brechbuhl, Eric Address: Lowen Platz 5 CH-6004 Lucerne: Country: Switzerland: Years in CIIPE: 2007, 2015 Awards in CIIPE: 2015 - Award winner.
  • Therefore, graphic design can not be 'flat', if the plane is the case, then the connotation and thought is the soul of the design, two in one, is a good design. ORGANIZATION: XiAn Academy of Fine Arts.

Erich Lehman of 1975 Gallery and WALL THERAPY is changing the community and going deep. INTERVIEW NO. I’ve taught Digital Art and Graphic Design at The College at Brockport – one of my former students actually is in her first year of graduate school at my alma mater VSW! Meet the I Heart ROC team TEAM INTRO BY MARIA GORRE.

“He wanted to draw a different type family for every single entry of the 19th century British classification system, and we were like: ‘Dude, chill out, focus on one thing’, so he started refining the grotesk. We definitely took him through the ringer, and I’m really proud of him.” —. Studio Spass is a Rotterdam-based agency working across various design mediums, always injecting an entertaining sense of personality, reflected in the studio’s name – which means “fun” in German. The studio created the visual identity for Spring, a ten day festival for experimental dance and performing arts earlier this year in Utrecht. Founding designer Jaron Korvinus discusses the studio’s design process with It’s Nice That, producing an original identity that literally “morphs, bends and stretches the imagery” to reflect the experimental choreography of the festival. Risograph printing is internationally loved by artists and creatives for its vibrant qualities that bring out some of the best colour and texture you can find in print. As part of the Magical Riso biennial this month, at the renowned Van Eyck Institute, independent publishers, artists and presses from around the world took part in the Magical Riso 2018.

Interview With Graphic Designer Erich Brechbuhler

The event demonstrated how creatives at the forefront of the Risograph printing industry are pushing the medium to its furthest extremes, continuing to surprise Risograph-lovers with unexpected colour combinations and a sense of depth that is only achievable in stencil-based printing methods. At Nicer Tuesdays yesterday evening we laughed and learned a lot. From animator Laurie Rowan opening the event with an insightful talk on how to really go for what you actually want to do in creativity, Francesca Allen teaching the audience about how photography is far much more than just pressing a shutter, Yuri Suzuki showing us how sound can be utilised to improve communication through design (and giving us a banging DJ set in a high vis jacket ensemble) to illustrator Anna Haifisch giving a comic reading that left everyone in stitches. “To be honest, just making work is my favourite thing,” says Sydney-based artist and designer, Kris Andrew Small, “I’m not super concerned with how or what I am making.” With a distinctively bold and unencumbered visual language, Kris’ work is also hard to define and often the result of multiple influences and experiences. “I guess a lot of my work comes from my childhood, growing up in the 90s in a tropical part of Australia was pretty colourful and flamboyant, that has always really stuck in my brain.” —. Having been founded in New York, Sharp Type has since been based in Granada, and is now run between Madrid and San Francisco, with employees back in New York, too.

Living abroad has given Chantra and Lucas a new perspective on work: “The world is globalising, whether or not people are fighting against it and we found that being in Spain was an amazing opportunity to jump ahead of the curve”, says Chantra. They’ve been working with people in China, Japan, Korea and India, as well as designers across Europe and the US, and finding the balance between working internationally and having a team mentality has been challenging. “We’ve been debating this – how to grow globally, but also be able to get people in the same room, at least occasionally” says Chantra. “When we were in Granada, we’d have lots of people over to our place. We’d try to have two weeks working, mentoring or just making friends and being in the same space, establishing that rapport”, Lucas continues. “The thing about the industry is, it’s small, and you never know where the next talent is going to pop up.”For its most recent release, Garnett, Sharp Type worked with, who’d originally conceived of it as part of his undergraduate thesis project. “It was nuts”, Lucas says.

“He wanted to draw a different type family for every single entry of the 19th century British classification system, and we were like: ‘Dude, chill out, focus on one thing’, so he started refining the grotesk. We definitely took him through the ringer, and I’m really proud of him.” —. Now in its 7th year of publishing, Aint Bad, the magazine of new photographic art founded in Savannah, Georgia, is revisiting one of its core themes and values, collaboration. Each issue starts with an open call, from which a group of photographers decide on a selection. For Issue 13, the curators chose “a diverse group of artists who are making work in just about every way possible”; “each one of them expressing extremely personal and often universal experiences, each project emanating passion for people, place and planet”, according to a statement from the magazine.

Mould Map 7 – Earth Pantropy, published by Landfill Editions, takes the opposite approach to the last edition – which collected the work of 76 practitioners in an exhibition – and presents 30 new digital commissions in an online anthology. Edited by Hugh Frost and Leon Sadler, Mould Map 7 explores the theme of pantropy, “a hypothetical process of humans being modified to thrive in the existing environment”: “Through the new works, the idea of pantropy is explored in off-world settings as well as contemporary reality in adapting the self (physically and mentally) to the spheres of technology, work, food and romance”, Hugh tells It’s Nice That. For Amsterdam-based artist and illustrator Karan Singh and New York-based graphic designer Zuzanna Rogatty, November isn’t just for the beginning of colder days and the countdown to Christmas; it’s a month of celebration. Collaborating over for the next instalment of our monthly poster series, Karan and Zuzanna explored the festivities that accompany the evening of 5 November – better known to most of us as bonfire night, that wonderful thing where fireworks are lit and crowds gather to marvel at it all for just a few minutes.

Interview With Graphic Designer Erich Brechbuhle

Graphic

Interview With Graphic Designer Erich Brechbuhl

The qipao, otherwise known as the cheongsam is a typical, traditional dress for Chinese women. But, the historic, “body-hugging” dress has evolved from 17th century Qing dynasty uniform to a stereotypical form of fetishising Chinese women in the West. This subject is a focus for Melbourne-based fashion designer Betty Liu who explores the typecast roles of Chinese women through fashion, particularly through the idea of the pure “lotus flower and its antithesis, the dragon lady,” she describes. Through examining the Western fascination with the qipao, which connotes “tones of hyper-sexuality and mystique”, Betty aims to create innovative work that comments on Asian stereotypes without “deliberately sexualising the dress.” —. In today’s world of contemporary art where anything can be deemed art as long as enough people say so, the ever-blurring boundaries of the subject are becoming fuzzier by the minute.

If one end of the spectrum sees art reaching its metaphysical heights, at the other there are organisations like Forensic Architecture, which works to uncover the truth of real events in minute detail. Although the London-based research agency seems far removed from today’s general perception of contemporary art — a world filled with eccentricity, concerns of gallery representation and commercial sales — Forensic Architecture is nonetheless nominated for this year’s prestigious Turner Prize. Having just won the Beazley Design of the Year award, the agency is treading new territory, navigating between the spheres of science, architecture and now, art, to provide justice for some of the world’s most underrepresented communities. Studio Spass is a Rotterdam-based agency working across various design mediums, always injecting an entertaining sense of personality, reflected in the studio’s name – which means “fun” in German. The studio created the visual identity for Spring, a ten day festival for experimental dance and performing arts earlier this year in Utrecht.

Founding designer Jaron Korvinus discusses the studio’s design process with It’s Nice That, producing an original identity that literally “morphs, bends and stretches the imagery” to reflect the experimental choreography of the festival. Colour theory is an essential component of the visual arts. The practice involves the process of mixing colours to create a complementary palette of colours. There is also an element of psychology within colour theory, as certain colours evoke particular emotions. Raw Color is an Eindhoven-based studio working between the disciplines of graphic design and photography.

Its sophisticated studio output notably pays attention to the delicacy of colour. Through conducting experimental research, Raw Color has recently expanded its practice to make 3D objects as seen in the project, Props & Prints. Published by Loose Joints, Robin Friend’s Bastard Countryside is the photographer’s first book and it collects together 15 years worth of exploration of the British landscape, or what Victor Hugo called “the bastard countryside”.

“Each photograph represents a small part of the story of how modern living is changing the environment”, says Robin. And although the series has been photographed in the UK, “the subjects and themes are global, and invite the viewer to reflect on the actions that have shaped and shifted the spaces they relate to”.

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