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At the Consumer Electronics Show (CES), the focus this year was mainly on virtual reality headsets and smart connected appliances, but was also on the world of TVs and home theater technology. In fact, a new buzzword made its way around the expo in no time: Ultra HD Blu-ray. And as it turns out, it’s more than just a buzzword.

Ultra HD Blu-ray is one of the more exciting home entertainment trends to watch out for in 2016. It sounds like a jargon-loaded term and seems a bit intimidating at first, but don’t worry, it’s not that complex. Here’s everything you need to know about Ultra HD Blu-ray and how it will affect your home entertainment going forward. What Is Ultra HD Blu-Ray? Right now, you are probably already familiar with Blu-ray discs and technology.

Currently, Blu-ray movies that you buy on discs are limited to Full HD resolution (which is 1920 x 1080 pixels). Over the past couple of years, a new standard of high definition has grown in acceptance: Ultra HD, also known as 4K (which is 3840 x 2160 pixels). It’s truly one of the terms you need to know before buying a TV today, so if it’s still foreign to you, take this time to get comfortable with it. Ultra HD is roughly twice the resolution of Full HD, and TVs are increasingly offering this resolution now. But the only physical medium that can handle it at this time is the Ultra HD Blu-ray disc. Google earth 6.2.0.5905 beta 6.1.0.5001 for mac. In other words, Ultra HD Blu-ray is the only current type of disc that can contains and play 4K videos.

日本アイ・ビー・エム External MiniSAS 8088/MiniSAS 8088 0.6mケーブル(00WE754) 取り寄せ商品 《送料無料(一部離島など除く)》media5 10倍脳を鍛える! DVDFab Blu-ray Copy is the first full-featured Blu-ray copier/burner/cloner to copy a Blu-ray, 3D included, to any Blu-ray/DVD disc or to your hard drive with just one or a few clicks.

Ultra HD Blu-Ray vs. Regular Blu-Ray Current Blu-ray movie discs generally use single layer Blu-rays. A single layer Blu-ray can hold up to 25 GB of data.

Ultra HD Blu-ray movie discs mainly use double layer Blu-ray discs that can hold up to 66 GB of data, but can also use triple layer discs that can go up to 100 GB of data. So the amount of information stored on an Ultra HD Blu-ray is roughly twice that of a current Blu-ray. While that doesn’t mean it looks twice as good, it does mean the images will contain more details and thus look visibly better than current Blu-rays. Ultra HD Blu-ray also adopts a new feature that makes for drastically better image quality: High Dynamic Range (HDR). TVs that support HDR have improved contrast and fuller colors, and because Ultra HD Blu-ray will also support HDR, it means that your home entertainment experience will be greater than ever before. Ultra HD Blu-Ray vs. 4K Streaming Streaming services like Netflix have also started offering Ultra HD videos among the things you can watch in 4K.

But as any expert will tell you, good quality video is more than just having a high resolution. Take the file size itself. To stream 4K, Netflix estimates that 7 GB of data will be used per hour, so that’s 14 GB total for a two-hour movie.

As we’ve seen above, an Ultra HD Blu-ray disc offers far more data (and therefore quality) for the same amount of time. That’s because quality is determined by bitrate, and a higher bitrate means better quality because there’s more information being transmitted per second of video — but higher bitrate also means a larger file size. To get the best possible bitrate, you’ll need to watch 4K on Ultra HD Blu-ray.

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Plus, Netflix requires you to have a 25 Mbps line to stream its videos, which is something that not everyone has. And that’s not to mention the fact that people with data caps will reach those limits in absolutely no time with 4K streaming. You’ll Need a New Blu-Ray Player The current generation of Blu-ray disc players will not support Ultra HD Blu-ray discs. At CES, some companies debuted their new Ultra HD Blu-ray players, with most costing about $400. We’ve previously shared some, and often recommended the PlayStation 3 or among them, but even those. If you want to enjoy the latest in high-resolution movies, you’ll need to buy a new device.

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No exceptions. Hot Search: That being said, it’s best to wait since the prices of these players are likely to fall later.

In case you want to buy it right now, Panasonic’s DMP-UB900 and Samsung’s UBD-K8500 seem like safe bets. One thing to remember: what you’re looking for is an Ultra HD 4K Blu-ray Player, which is different from a “4K Blu-ray Player” or a “4K Upscaled Blu-ray player”.

Case in point, the Sony BDP-S7200 will not play these new Ultra HD Blu-ray discs; it takes current generation Full HD Blu-rays and artificially upscales them. Pay attention to these details when you’re making your purchase.Ultra HD Blu-ray Is Backwards Compatible All right, so you’ll need to buy a new Blu-ray player, but what about your existing discs? The good news is that they’ll all run just fine at Full HD resolution.

In fact, as mentioned above, some Ultra HD Blu-ray players will even be able to. Granted, this won’t look as good as an Ultra HD disc, but it’s still something! But the thing to remember is that all existing Blu-rays, DVDs, and VCDs will run perfectly on these new players, and even benefit from some upscaling at times. This also means that you can buy an Ultra HD Blu-ray player right now even if you don’t have a 4K TV yet.A Note on Current 4K TVs We’ve often said that buying a 4K TV right now is a waste of money, but in the case that you already bought one, well, you might not get all the benefits of the new Ultra HD Blu-ray standard, but you will get some. For example, since your 4K TV can support the resolution of Ultra HD Blu-rays, you’ll see them at maximum pixels, so the images should be sharp. However, HDR is a new feature so unless you bought a 4K HDR TV that supports the HDR 10 standard, you won’t get the better quality images. Very few televisions from 2015 and 2016 support this, so check your manual.Availability of Ultra HD Content Of course, the big question in upgrading to Ultra HD Blu-ray right now is whether you will get to watch stuff that you really want to watch.

Hollywood studios want to back the new medium, but not every film is going to be available in Ultra HD. The thing is, there’s “upscaled 4K” and “real 4K” in films. You see, not all movies are shot using 4K cameras. More often than not digital filmmakers use 2K cameras, and even those who use 4K cameras don’t always have the special effects done in 4K.

On the other hand, movies shot on 35mm or 70mm film can be converted to digital 4K with fantastic clarity. Reference Home Theater explains all of this beautifully:. Mad Max: Fury Road is shot in 2.8K and has special effects done in 2K, so the Ultra HD Blu-ray disc will merely be upscaled to 4K. The Martian was shot in 4K but has special effects done in 2K, so for the Ultra HD Blu-ray disc they will use real-world shots from the 4K master video while special effects will be only upscaled from the 2K video. Sicario was shot in 4K and has very few special effects, so the whole movie should more or less be converted to true 4K for the Ultra HD Blu-ray disc.

While a 4K master is obviously superior, these upscaled 2K-to-4K videos should still look pretty good — definitely better than the Full HD Blu-ray you currently have. It’s why it makes sense to avoid stuff like the Star Wars collection and wait for the 4K version. The Blu-ray consortium has a 4K release calendar that you can check for any movie you’re interested in.What Do You Think of Ultra HD Blu-ray? As of now, this is almost everything you need to know about the new Ultra HD Blu-ray standard, and what you’ll get out of it. For more information on it, check out the official 4K Blu-ray page. Does Ultra HD Blu-ray seem worth it to you?

Will you trade in your current Blu-ray player for it? Which movies are you looking forward to seeing in this new high-quality format? We’d love to hear your thoughts about this new tech in the comments below. For more details, refer to the. Editor’s Notes: can on Blu-ray/DVD movies then convert them to your devices or NAS supported MP4, WMV, MOV, etc format and optimzed preset preserving original video in good condition.

It can copy and convert the normal DVDs, CSS protected DVDs, commercial DVDs, Sony ArccOS DVDs, all region 1-6 DVDs and any commercial Blu-ray disc, folder, ISO images and so on to the right video formats like AVI, MKV, FLV, MP4 and so on that your Portable devices can support playing. What’s more, if you have some other devices like iPad Air 3, iPad mini 4, iPhone 6S/6S Plus, Galaxy Tab S, Amazon Kindle Fire HDX, Surface Pro 4, PS4, PS3, Xbox, NAS, HDD, etc. The best Blu-ray/DVD Ripper also has them as its output choice, which means you can also convert BD/DVD videos to play DVD/BD videos on your portable devices or via, etc.

Hi All, I, along with a few of us who attended the Hi Fi show was quite impressed with the Kaleidescape demo but now that it seems these guys have crashed & burnt.(high cost of entry) it's got me thinking.what else is out there? I'm currently running a Sony 1080P PJ connected to a Oppo 93 but could be tempted in 12-18 months to upgrade to a 4K PJ but rather than buying a 4K player, maybe it's time I rip all my movies into a database & use a product similar to Kaleidescape to play all my content. What is holding me back at the moment is really poor internet speed in the Adelaide Hills so streaming for me, using something like PLEX is out until Mr nbn comes along. So, what's out there that could be rack mounted & with internally stored media to play direct into TV's & Projector etc? It doesn't need to be 4K, as blu-ray quality is ok at the moment but it would need the ability to be upgraded & possibly stream in the future when this is viable at our house? Also.what's the quickest way to rip 100's of movies (DVD's & BD's)? It would be great if you could simply show proof of ownership online & then obtain a digital copy!

I've nearly gone down this road in the past but if it's going to take hours to burn a BD disc, then that aint happening! Thanks everyone Matt. Matt I have a Blu-ray drive (?Samsung) that you can borrow in the shorter term if you want to try something.

Was probably $100, I still want it but happy to lend it for a week or three. I run it on Windows though - I assume USB connection works on a MAC.

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I don't think it matters with USB 3.0 on a USB 2.0 computer - the drive just goes 'slower' with the data transfer, ie the drives tend to be backwards compatible. A lend will confirm this if mine happens to be USB 3.0. If you succeed with your blu-ray video, you could also do your blu-ray hi-rez audio files Benje Edited September 20, 2016 by Benje. Mattsome clarifications and distinctions, kaledescape is not dead, it was actually saved however price of entry and likely copyright in our region has meant never really kicked off. Somethings a home brew will never be that a kaleidecape is is you can't buy movies off their store. You can't upgrade movies that might have dvd to their blu-ray version or 4k uhd version. At this stage there is no way of ripping 4k UHDs you can do what most have been doing over a few years now I myself have done with some dvds and blu-rays and that is rip using dvd fab or equivalent.

Some things to keep in mind start getting up into the 100s and your cost is going to go up significantly with running a nas drive and such. Also do keep in mind that your media play back solutions end up diminishing as well. In off the shelf media players I know of two at present that are good likely options, one begin the dune4k solo I onwed a dunehd myself and I think the pick as units out there. There is also the mede8er also mentioned in that thread. With ripping a few discs my hindsight whether of value to you or not is to consider carefully just what you rip. Its a senseless thing to be just ripping stuff non stopjust taking up your time and space to manage it and then the effort goes to keep it backed up etc and investment with a nas drives and suchthe bigger the collection the bigger and enormous it gets. Id suggest a better option is to just rip the disc you might watch regularly.

In hind sight I found really its the kids movies that got a flogging and made sense in ripping those.others where might watch again once a year. Might as well grab the disc pop in a player and hit play! Hi Al, Thanks for taking the time to raise some of the issues with burning & more the point, storing the file. How big is a BD file BTW? I don't have a NAS, I did investigate this but ended up spending my time sorting out my music storage & playback.

I'm not that tech savvy & we have really slow internet & therefore slow wifi so I decided to not go down that road as I wasn't sure I could actually stream anything but once we get nbn.I'm sure it's not all that hard??? The thought of having all my DVD's & BD's stored electronically does have some appeal but I also don't want to spend 100's of hours burning discs. I did see the DUNE system & it looks good but I then struggled to find any review on YouTube in English so I wasn't sure they were available in Australia?

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I assume you're talking about this one: I'll keep researching & asking questions.plus I'll burn a few BD's using Benji's spinner & see how long it takes & the storage it needs etc. Cheers Matthew. Hi Al, Thanks for taking the time to raise some of the issues with burning & more the point, storing the file. How big is a BD file BTW? I don't have a NAS, I did investigate this but ended up spending my time sorting out my music storage & playback. I'm not that tech savvy & we have really slow internet & therefore slow wifi so I decided to not go down that road as I wasn't sure I could actually stream anything but once we get nbn.I'm sure it's not all that hard??? The thought of having all my DVD's & BD's stored electronically does have some appeal but I also don't want to spend 100's of hours burning discs.

I did see the DUNE system & it looks good but I then struggled to find any review on YouTube in English so I wasn't sure they were available in Australia? I assume you're talking about this one: I'll keep researching & asking questions.plus I'll burn a few BD's using Benji's spinner & see how long it takes & the storage it needs etc. Cheers Matthew blu-ray discs can be anything from 25GB for single layer to 50GB, (4k uhd is 100GB however no way to rip these) movies can wary but theyre still flipping big files! While you don't need a NAS for music. For movies and if start ripping away it will become necessary. I ended up having my NAS die and take its disc drives with it.

That for me was last straw and sold off my dune hd. The dune hd is not available anymore, their newer model is. Likely have to purchase of their ebay retailer. Do keep in mind media players like this are not like any other hifi component or consumer gear especially when software involved is cracking cinavia anti piracy tech.

Main reason for instance likes of both oppo and cambridge were forced to remove iso play back capability. Ps re zapiti.

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Am pretty sure I used their software on the dune at one stage for skin and user interface. However media players are another thing. Currently ripping my BD collection using a 2009 iMac with an external BD drive and Aurora Mac Blu-Ray Copy. Ripping the full disc as an ISO - storage is on 3 x 5TB Seagate External Drives connected to my router (so network accessible). Playback is via Kodi on a 4K Android b ox - works beautifully. Only issue is it can take over 3-5 hours per disc. Not sure if this is because I have a crappy external BD drive thats slow as a wet week, or the process (2009 iMac with 16GB Ram).

Main reason for ripping is convenience - my collection is stored in a storage room and nothing about head height ever seems to get played! Edited September 21, 2016 by Hydrology.

Currently ripping my BD collection using a 2009 iMac with an external BD drive and Aurora Mac Blu-Ray Copy. Ripping the full disc as an ISO - storage is on 3 x 5TB Seagate External Drives connected to my router (so network accessible). Playback is via Kodi on a 4K Android b ox - works beautifully. Only issue is it can take over 3-5 hours per disc.

Not sure if this is because I have a crappy external BD drive thats slow as a wet week, or the process (2009 iMac with 16GB Ram). Main reason for ripping is convenience - my collection is stored in a storage room and nothing about head height ever seems to get played! Having ripped on my 2011 macbook pro and external drive, I would say you have a combination of things going on to slow you down. Software and hardware related. My rips were taking a lot lot faster than that, I think on the outer maybe 2 hours or so at worst.

But been a while since done rips basically since got rid of the nas not see the need / value of it anymore. Ps with the kids stuff with netflix there is a lot of stuff for them to watch there. There are some blu-rays and dvds they still regularly watchhowever its not a huge collection of theirs so have just put them in one location in shelf unit we have and daughter seems to be able to fish out of there what she wants to watch and knows how to work neflix so not been a huge concern for me anymore. Thanks for everyone's contributions.I can tell you all that if it's taking me 2-3 hrs to rip (I'll get the lingo correct!) each BD I'll give up on this project pretty quick smart. I'd love to able access Netflix etc but hamstrung by internet speed so this is why I was thinking about ripping them to a HD/NAS.

I'll have a play & reassess I think as I'm also using a 2009 iMac with 16 GB ram but it looks like the actual BD player largely dictates speed? Cheers Matthew Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk. My iMac is only USB 2.0 anyways so can't go any faster. Was looking at a OWC BD, DVD & CD burner that was 16x & cost about $240? Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk mines a panasonic drive.

In a generic case. That owc one sounds quite expensive. I don't think i paid that much? Maybe try out benje's one first as he is offering. See if kind of thing want to do.

And then do a bit of research on the appropriate mac osx compatible drives. My panasonic works across both mac osx and windows which is handy as can utilise for my windows netbook. Rather than hog the mac ripping I ended up utilising the netbook in end as could leave it doing its thing.

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