Can't Uninstall From Computer

If your game is installed and authenticated through Steam, please follow these instructions instead of those listed below. To manually uninstall a PC game,. Uninstall Dropbox if it came preloaded on your computer. If the manufacturer of your computer preloaded Dropbox, you may also need to uninstall the promotional software that came with your device. To do so: Launch the Add/Remove Programs utility. Windows 8: Click Start. Click Control Panel. Click Uninstall a program. Windows 10: Click Start. Jun 16, 2012  Whenever I try to uninstall this program, nothing happens. I tried clicking the uninstall button several times, but it said to wait until it was done uninstalling. I go back later and its still there.

  1. Can't Scan From My Computer
  2. Things You Can Uninstall From Computer
  3. Can't Get Into My Computer
  4. I Can't Restore My Computer

So you tried out some software, hated it, and tried to uninstall it, and now it's leaving remnants in your Start menu. It's not uncommon to find leftover files, folders, and even Start menu entries after you uninstall a program. That's because, like messy children, a lot of do a poor job of cleaning up after themselves.

The solution is to use a brute-force uninstaller, a utility that removes not only the application but also all of the pieces it leaves behind. The free, one such tool, vacuums up files, stray Registry entries, and more. It's also good at clearing out. (For more solutions to perplexing PC problems, see ').

Several things happen during the installation of a program, which can help explain why you are having difficulties uninstalling it:. When you download a program, the files are copied to a specified folder, which is usually somewhere inside the Program Files folder.

Some files, such as shared libraries (.dll files), will be copied into a folder inside Program Files called Common Files. Other files, such as drivers or shared libraries (again), are copied into the WINDOWS System32 and WINDOWS System32 drivers folders. After that the installer makes some changes inside the Windows Registry. This is a database where all the settings and options for the operating system are stored, as well as for any applications or OS components that are programmed to use it. The installer can make changes inside the Registry if a shared library needs to be registered or if certain types of files need to be associated with the program being installed.

For example, if you install Microsoft Word, then you will also be able to open Microsoft Word documents. After this is done, a key is added to the Windows Registry where the Windows Add/Remove tool looks for installed programs.

During installation, all these operations for installing are logged in a special log file (for example, setup.log), and the installation program usually puts that file inside the application's folder along with the uninstaller. When a user tries to remove a program through the Add/Remove tool, Windows looks for the registered uninstaller inside the registry and executes it. The uninstaller goes through the log file and undoes all the changes done during installation. That is, it deletes all the files that have been copied, all the Registry keys the installer created, and so forth. If there is no log file, or if there is no record of the changes made to the registry the uninstaller might fail to uninstall the program, and will need to be removed by other means.

In short, normally programs are removed using an uninstaller, reading the documentation written during their installation. If for some reason the file that contains these instructions was never produced in the first place, the program will be impossible to uninstall normally using the Windows Add/Remove tool.

If you're comfortable working with the Windows Registry yourself, you can perform a manual force uninstall. Be careful when working in your operating system's database as you don't want to accidentally delete essential files. It goes without saying that this is pretty advanced stuff, and if you're not a power user, then perhaps you should consider downloading an uninstaller. To manually remove a program you have to find the program key in the Windows Registry. The Registry contains keys and values; keys are containers that perform a similar function to file folders, and may contain values or more keys. However, before manipulating the Registry, it would be wise to back it up in case something goes wrong.

For Windows Vista or above:. If operating Windows 8 or above, swipe from the right and bring up Search. In Windows 7 or Vista, click Start. Type regedit.exe into the search box; provide administrator confirmation if asked.

Click the Registry key you wish to back up. Select File, then Export. Select the location where you want to save the backup, then Save. If using Windows XP:. Click Start and then Run.

Type%SystemRoot% system32 restore rstrui.exe. Click Enter or OK. You will be taken to the Welcome to System Restore page. Select Create a Restore Point then Next. Type a name to be the restore point and Create. Now, you can carry on with your uninstall, and restore the registry as is if you delete the wrong thing. Finally, you need to find all the files that were copied onto your computer during installation.

Open the folder where the uninstalled program should be, and look for files which are named uninstall.log or setup.log or something similar. Inside this file is a list of files that have been installed with the corresponding program. Open the file on Notepad and read through to find all of the files that have been copied onto your system during installation. Delete the files and you'll get rid of the program almost fully. Just got around to doing this.I first checked the avira free site and found its instruction to be useless.it doesn't work. So then I tried its 'help' assist.

Can't Scan From My Computer

Bingo, ZIP there, too. I take it the avira people don't want their users to leave. I guess that's why they have misleading update pop-ups which are really plugs for their not free versions. I used to recommend the avira anti-vi program. But, because of these failures, no more. On the other hand, unwittingly, the producers have been quite successful in producing at least one anti-avira user however.

Give credit when credit is due, I say. So, I used to use this website called 'listentoyoutube' to get sound files off of YouTube because I am starting to make animations and intros for my YouTube channel.

Well, I went on this site, like any other day, but this time when I was downloading the sound file of a Gaming YouTuber's video, it told me to download this thing, and I figured, 'Oh ok, maybe the site updated and this is for easier converting or something.' Well, when I downloaded it, I got ads all over the place, and things have attempted to download by themselves that Chrome has blocked due to malicious reasons. I at first tried uninstaling via Add/Remove Programs because the thing is called YouTubeAdblocker and was downloaded the same exact time the download for the sound file was made. That didn't work. Then, I stumbled upon this, and I thought, 'My savior!'

Can

Only to find out that it didn't show up. It had every other thing under my software except for that. Is there anyway to remove this without restoring my computer to factory settings? Or do I absolutely HAVE to restore my computer to factory settings? Im trying to delete my lockbox because i forgot my password. Im hoping when i delete it, i could reinstall it to make a new password.

But when i tried to remove it in control panel it asks me for password. Then i ended the process from task manager so i could delete the lockbox folder. Then i went to regedit and got rid of everything that had to do with my lockbox.

I got happy, until i went to reinstall it. When it finished, i went to open it and it still asked me for the password.wth!! How do i get thru this? Where is it storing the password? Im trying to delete my lockbox because i forgot my password.

Im hoping when i delete it, i could reinstall it to make a new password. But when i tried to remove it in control panel it asks me for password. Then i ended the process from task manager so i could delete the lockbox folder. Then i went to regedit and got rid of everything that had to do with my lockbox. I got happy, until i went to reinstall it.

When it finished, i went to open it and it still asked me for the password. What the hell! How do i get thru this? Where is it storing the password? Didn't do a thing for me, I had to do a syste mrestore to an earlier version. It wouldn't allow me to change anything in the registry, giving me the same meaase that I do't have sufficient permssion to access i t.

What idiot wrote this into windows, and thought he was being cute. Sombody ought to bitch slap him to hell and back again. It is MY computer and 'I' have al lthe permission I need to do ANYTHING on MY computer and who does microsoft thjink they are by even THINKING of permissions? Blooming idiots.

Like I said 'It is MY f'ing' comuoter and I control all who is and what is on it, not you, microsoft idoits. I am going to linux, like everyone else. Take that microsoft jackasses. Think I need your 'permission' t odo it? THINK AGAIN.MR. For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: Show Details Necessary HubPages Device ID This is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons. Login This is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.

How to uninstall from computerFrom

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Things You Can Uninstall From Computer

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Can't Get Into My Computer

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I Can't Restore My Computer

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